Book Review: Forensic Faith by J. Warner Wallace

May 16, 2017 Christian, J. Warner Wallace, nonfiction 3

about the book

Forensic Faith will help readers:

  • understand why they have a duty to defend the truth
  • develop a training strategy to master the evidence for Christianity
  • learn how to employ the techniques of a detective to discover new insights from God’s Word
  • become better communicators by learning the skills of professional case makers

With real-life detective stories, fascinating strategies, and biblical insights, Wallace teaches readers cold-case investigative disciplines they can apply to their Christian faith. Forensic Faith is an engaging, fresh look at what it means to be a Christian.

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GENRE: Christian Nonfiction, Apologetics
PUBLISHER: David C. Cook
RELEASE DATE: May 1, 2017
PAGES: 256

“Now, more than ever, Christians must shift from accidental belief to evidential trust.”

Wallace pin1As a diehard fan of Dateline NBC and the copious cold-case and forensic files shows on TV, this book by cold-case homicide detective J. Warner Wallace is right up my alley!

Wallace uses his training & experience as a detective, along with his passion for apologetics, to present a case for “making the case” for Christianity.  In particular, he references the need to equip our kids to know what they believe and why they believe it so that they have a fighting chance of surviving college with their faith intact.

I really liked the references to the cold-cases he investigated/solved and then how he tied this forensic process to how we should be examining our faith. All of his points are solid – and important – and copiously backed up with Scripture. Along with all the great information and instruction, the aesthetics of the book make the intellectual discussion feel more conversational. (And let’s be honest – the way the book is laid out appeals to that side of me that always wanted to be a cold-case detective lol)

Bottom Line: Forensic Faith by J. Warner Wallace is well written and engaging. It’s easy to follow and several added touches keep the interest level high. We don’t have to leave our intellect at the door when we decide to follow Jesus, and this book gives us permission to be smart about our faith. It also could give us permission to argue with people who don’t believe the same way, and this is my one hesitation about the book. Let’s be prepared to protect our hearts (and minds) when our faith is challenged, but let’s also keep in mind that Jesus said “they will know you are Christians by your LOVE”, not your arguments. We need to always be prepared to give an answer for the hope we have, yes, but let’s not leave our hearts at the door in the process of making sure we keep our brains.

(I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from the publisher. All views expressed are only my honest opinion.)

My Rating: 4 stars / Well-done resource!

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about the author

J. Warner Wallace is a cold-case homicide detective who has been featured on Dateline, Fox News, and Court TV. A former atheist, he is the author of “Cold-Case Christianity” and “God’s Crime Scene.” Wallace has a master’s degree in theology and lives in California with his wife and four children.
Find out more about J. Warner Wallace at http://coldcasechristianity.com.

Other Books by J. Warner Wallace

 

Carrie

3 Responses to “Book Review: Forensic Faith by J. Warner Wallace”

  1. Andi

    As a woman who grew up in the church, and went to a private Christian college, which I’d never do again, I wish I’d have been taught not only our beliefs but how to defend my beliefs against other religions. I’ve learned that over the years by having teaching pastors, but I wish I would’ve learned that in college instead of having to take New and Old Testament. I wish my kids would have learned that too.

    • Carrie

      it’s important stuff to learn!! (I went to a private Christian college and loved it, by the way, but it didn’t teach me more than I already knew as far as defending my beliefs)

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